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Brits Americans
Getting in to america!!! 
16th-Mar-2012 12:24 am
I really really want to live and work in America ever since I've been a little whipper snapper!! Now i have a under grad degree and i have a Masters degree in film production. but is it worth my while to pay one of these company's that look for a sponsor for the H1B visa??? considering both my degree's are media related?? 

Peace

Ash
Comments 
16th-Mar-2012 05:13 am (UTC)
I'd suggest a reccie vacation first. I'm no expert in film stuff, but maybe head to LA and see what's out there in the movie industry, maybe try to get some personal contacts?
I dunno, it sounds like one helluva long shot. There are metric shittons of film grads over here that can't find work in the industry as it is. But good luck to ya!
16th-Mar-2012 06:38 am (UTC)
You have no worthwhile experience and the US has zillions of their own unemployed dreamers with your qualifications. Not going to happen, sorry - why would any company sponsor you or be able to justify the visa?
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16th-Mar-2012 09:35 am (UTC)
This was my first thought on reading. We wondered about moving out to the USA after a few holidays there (and I have enough work experience etc. to have head-hunters asking me to do just that, so that side wouldn't be a problem), but once I looked into the health care system - no way! "Being alive" tends to include long term health conditions like "getting old", and I'm not trusting the American system to provide for them. Look into it very carefully indeed before making any long-term decisions.
16th-Mar-2012 10:11 am (UTC)
You have no idea how thankful I am that I now live in the UK after having a health issue that lasted for over a year and ended with surgery. At the same time, a friend in the US was going through a similar situation, and she's been handed a bill for over US$20k!
16th-Mar-2012 08:50 am (UTC)
Become a film producer here first, then you might be able to move to America through the contacts you make once you're at a high enough level. I very much doubt any company is going to sponsor someone fresh out of uni.
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16th-Mar-2012 10:33 am (UTC)
I concur. After all, it worked for Edgar Wright.
16th-Mar-2012 10:06 am (UTC)
It might also be worthwhile to investigate short courses over there - you'll make contacts and be there long enough to get more context both for US living and the work environment.
16th-Mar-2012 10:24 am (UTC)
Have you studied in the US at all? My flatmate has even less experience in her chosen field than me (so I'm skeptical but heh, at least she's trying) but she spent a semester at the University of Washington in Seattle and made some contacts there. She also had presentations from employers who say they will interview people over Skype.

The film industry is notoriously competitive though so I'm not saying it's impossible but be prepared for a struggle. Arm yourself, get work back home, expand your portfolio, make contacts.

16th-Mar-2012 11:35 am (UTC)
It occurs to me that younger friends have spent time in the USA working in "summer camps" in various roles. That might be an interesting option for you - get to know the USA for a few months, get some idea of working life, and maybe even get involved in camp activities centred around making films at an amateur level.
16th-Mar-2012 05:39 pm (UTC)
Camp America is the one that like, everyone I know has done. They speak really highly of it!
16th-Mar-2012 01:30 pm (UTC)
Not trying to dismiss all the work you've put in thus far - just being realistic based on what I've seen/heard, but...

There are tons of graduates with Masters degrees are here in the States that are serving fast food because that's the only job they could get. I do know one recent graduate who was fortunate to get a job in the industry, but that's only because he worked unpaid internships every summer while he was at uni (and the internships came through his having been a student at that university). My gut feeling is that your chances of being sponsored are *very* slim unless you've got an incredible body of work in your portfolio. Realistically, the fact that you've got media-related degrees won't impress anyone as far as getting a job goes. Best of luck, though.

ETA: Making contacts will be your best bet so I'd focus on that as well as building your portfolio, over paying a company to find you a sponsor at this time.

Edited at 2012-03-16 01:32 pm (UTC)
16th-Mar-2012 10:19 pm (UTC)
I know someone who graduated from NYU with a degree in filmmaking (and that's a very highly thought of university) and he's still trying to make it big...he's finally getting some freelance work after 2 + years. I have a master's degree in education and just got a job as a long-term substitute for someone on a maternity leave...it took me 8 months to find a teaching job and it's a temporary position, not full-time. There are tons of highly educated people looking for a job right now, so the chances of hiring a non-American to do the work that millions of Americans are dying to do is not very likely at all. Sorry if this seems harsh, but that's the reality of the job market.
16th-May-2012 12:20 pm (UTC)
You never quite know what companies are looking for. It's worth investigating/applying for positions because (especially in your field) they may be looking for a 'different' voice.

No doubt there are thousands of Americans looking at similar jobs but it's possible that as a Brit you may have an advantage.

But I do concur with other commenters: look for work in the UK, build a portfolio and then see where that takes you.

Good luck!
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